Art design

Target selects Savannah for its high school art design pilot program

Jenkins High School seniors Olivia James and Vaux South have a head start in the art design world thanks to the Target department store’s virtual Advancing Design Diversity program. Savannah is one of only three cities to host it. The pilot program is offered to 60 students across the country. Twenty were accepted from the Savannah Chatham County School District after the application process. “A lot of people go to Atlanta so I’m really surprised they came here to Savannah and really gave us this opportunity, so I’m really happy and grateful for that,” James said. The program offers a monthly webinar and one on mentorship with professional artists during the school year. “I can get exposure as an artist, meet other artists, and collaborate with other artists,” South said. “I really hope this opportunity will get your foot in the door for future business.” Rosemary Dodson, visual arts teacher specialist for the district, said Target ADD inspires students to think outside the box. “They don’t think about things like graphic design and interior design,” Dodson said. “They learn about different areas of design and how lucrative they can be and different ways to get into the design business.” The Target ADD program also allows students to connect with faculty and resources from three art and design universities across the country, including SCAD. The other two cities invited to participate in the program are Los Angeles and New York.

Jenkins High School seniors Olivia James and Vaux South have a head start in the art design world thanks to the Target department store’s virtual Advancing Design Diversity program. Savannah is one of only three cities to host it. The pilot program is offered to 60 students across the country. Twenty were accepted from the Savannah Chatham County School District after the application process. “A lot of people go to Atlanta so I’m really surprised they came here to Savannah and really gave us this opportunity, so I’m really happy and grateful for that,” James said.

The program offers a monthly webinar and one-on-one mentorship with professional artists during the school year. “I can get exposure as an artist, meet other artists, and collaborate with other artists,” South said. “I really hope this opportunity will open the door for me to do some future business.”

Rosemary Dodson, visual arts teacher for the district, said Target ADD inspires students to think outside the box. “They don’t think about things like graphic design and interior design,” Dodson said. “They learn about different areas of design and how lucrative they can be and different ways to get into the design business.”

The Target ADD program also allows students to connect with faculty and resources from three art and design universities across the country, including SCAD.

The other two cities invited to participate in the program are Los Angeles and New York.